Hardly Shakespeare

slutdust:

imsuchastar:

bagmilk:

"thats so gay"

*macklemore gasps in the distance*

*lady gaga clenches her chest in pain*

*hilary duff rounds a clothing display and approaches you, looking disappoint*

*queen latifah’s ample bosom glistens with rage-sweat

(via eden-rebel-giant)

My brother killed himself
on the twenty-eighth Thursday of last year
and I missed four days of work
and my mom wanted to know ‘Why’.
My brother
he was always a fan of beauty
but what he did
was not beautiful at all.

And last week I got the news
that one of my good friends from high school
had overdosed
(again)
except this time
she’d gone too far
and now she was gone.
And I had a hard time falling asleep at night
and her mother
hugged me tight
and thanked me for coming to the service
but I did not
want to be there at all.
This is not
beautiful.

The girl down the street
would’ve turned 21 last year
and I can scarcely imagine
the wild times she would’ve
(should’ve)
had.
But she is buried six feet deep
after falling nearly 300
and she did not leave a note.
This is not
beautiful.

My freshman year of college
and my roommate was beautiful
and how I wanted to be just like her.
But she wore herself down
till she was
almost invisible
and if you blinked
you had to go and find her all over again.
So now her parents are no longer supporting her college tuition
but are paying her hospital bills
watching their daughter crumble.
This is not
beautiful.

So y’all can take your narcissistic
romanticizing
and glamorizing
of self harm and eating disorders and committing suicide
and shove them as far up your ass
as you possibly can.
Starvation is not beautiful.
Killing yourself is not beautiful.
Sadness
is not beautiful.
This note I am writing
is not beautiful.

But you
you are beautiful
and it’s about damn time you start believing it.

—(via runiqu)

(via heatherwpetty)

helloyoucreatives:

 New from WCRS
The first ever ‘infectious’ wrapping paper has gone on sale today to help raise awareness and funds for homeless people this Christmas.  

Designed to look like snowflakes, the festive gift wrap re-creates viruses which pose serious health risks to people sleeping rough this winter including the common cold, influenza and pneumonia.  All proceeds will go to St Mungo’s, the charity which helps people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to rebuild their lives.

The limited edition wrapping paper is printed on 100% recycled stock and will be sold in sheets by selected retailers and online at wrapupproject.co.uk. 

Amazing idea. SHARE THE LINK, MUTHAS.

helloyoucreatives:

 New from WCRS

The first ever ‘infectious’ wrapping paper has gone on sale today to help raise awareness and funds for homeless people this Christmas. 

Designed to look like snowflakes, the festive gift wrap re-creates viruses which pose serious health risks to people sleeping rough this winter including the common cold, influenza and pneumonia.  All proceeds will go to St Mungo’s, the charity which helps people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to rebuild their lives.

The limited edition wrapping paper is printed on 100% recycled stock and will be sold in sheets by selected retailers and online at wrapupproject.co.uk.

Amazing idea. SHARE THE LINK, MUTHAS.

audacious14:

lotrlockedwhovian:

acureforbrainwork:

Hey everyone. I’m about to tell you all a really personal story, and then, I could use your help.

The blonde in the pictures above is my little sister, Rachel. She’s 14, a freshman in high school. She’s one of the smartest kids you’ll ever meet, to be honest. Smarter than me. She’s got an amazing sense of humor and the most gorgeous smile, the sort of person who just lights up a room with laughter after being in it for five minutes. Even though I’m 19 and I should be the tough one, she’s held me when I cried, and she cooks me dinner when I’m too lazy to do it, and she gives me confidence when I don’t believe in myself. We cosplay together, we fangirl together, and we talk Tumblr-speak at the dinner table. It’s not an exaggeration when I tell you this girl is my entire world. I’d do anything for her, and I love her more than words could fully describe.

On Friday, she was admitted to a psychiatric hospital after a year of battling severe depression and anxiety.

She thinks she’s ugly. She thinks her future doesn’t matter. She often hates herself, and can’t see all the amazing things everyone else knows is obvious just from their first glance at her.

The red tie on my wrist you see in the third picture was from her. Behavioral hospitals don’t allow anything with strings on them, so after she pulled out the tie for her sweatshirt, she wrapped it around my wrist for me to wear until she gets back. It might only be for a weekend, or it might be for longer. I don’t know yet.

Here’s where I’m asking for your help. At the earliest, Rachel is coming home on Sunday, but it’ll probably be longer. Still, that means I might only have two days to get the message out. I want to show her when she comes home that there are people out there who believe in her. Who think she’s beautiful and worth fighting for, worth recovery.

So please, reblog this and prove to her that she has more support than she ever realized. I’m hoping it’ll give her some confidence than she can get better.

Dear followers, please spread the love! The girl who posted this is incredibly sweet and super cool. Please help her and her sister out

Spread the love people!

You’re beautiful.

(via eden-rebel-giant)

<b>Song of the Seckii<b/> - A musical insight into the mind of a security guard. (Assumptions, of course.)

In case you were wondering what I was wearing. Barred for &#8216;dressing funny.&#8217;

In case you were wondering what I was wearing. Barred for ‘dressing funny.’

Dressed Funny.

On Saturday night, 2nd November, my mother and I went to Manly to celebrate my cousin’s impending wedding. At the door to Manly Wharf Hotel, I was denied entry by the security guard because I was “dressed funny.” I was given the option to change my outfit to which I declined. My mother complained to the manager that it was unfair to be barred on account of my alternative style, and as a result, was asked to leave the premises. This is my letter to that Security Guard.


To the Security Guard at Manly Wharf Hotel,

I need to apologise.

When you denied me entry to your establishment because I was “dressed funny” I immediately painted an ugly picture of you in my mind, envisioning a small-minded, insecure little man blinded by his own views of the world.

But making angry assumptions about others undermines my hope for a society that celebrates diversity and so, I was wrong to have judged you based on our brief encounter.

I don’t know your story. Perhaps you, yourself, struggled in your earlier years to find acceptance. Perhaps your search for individuality was so difficult, you gave in, and like you asked me to do, you changed. Perhaps you thought the best way to survive would be through conformity, and now, as a result, you expect all to think the same way.

I am fortunate to come from a loving and supportive family, who have seen me through the most trialling times in my search for acceptance. In fact, I have spent the last eleven months sober so I can better understand my place in the world.

When my mother saw the humiliation you caused, it seemed understandable that she sought to defend me. But maybe you’ve never had someone care for your individuality, and found her love confronting. Did it scare you enough that you had to deny her entry too?

I’m not sure if you’re a father yet, and if not, I hope one day you’ll have that chance. I hope that your son or daughter will grow up with a family that cares for, and supports them, no matter what they wear, who they love or what path they choose. I hope that you will help nourish your child’s individuality, and like my mother, defend your child if that right to expression is threatened. And finally, I hope that when your child comes to you, having been made to feel invalid or ostracised, and one day it will happen, you will take them in your arms and tell them to be brave. I hope that you will tell them that people can be cruel and unkind, but that we should never change, our clothes or otherwise, because everyone is different, and it is in this that life is beautiful.

So I apologise for my hypocrisy. I apologise for making a baseless judgement upon your character, and I am sorry for expecting you to see the world as my mother and I see it.

Because it is wrong to think we are all the same.

- Hayley Schumann-Mitchell, 24 years old, Narraweena

Nude Onstage With A Ukulele.

In a street behind Manly Wharf, folded away like a love letter from a past flame, you might come across a tidy little second-hand bookshop. Safe from the rolling slopes of sand and sun-crisped flesh, Desire Books is a haven for the Northern Beaches literati. Stocked with beat poets, new-age philosophers, and creased best-sellers from 1999, you’re bound to discover a treasure, or five.

On the last Tuesday of every month, they hold an open-mic night called Bonfire Desire. A red curtain drops and the book shop is transformed into an intimate performance space bordered by pre-loved tomes.

When I began playing ukulele last Christmas, I set a goal to perform at an open-mic night this year. [It’s important to note that I am petrified of singing in front of people, which made the fulfilment of this task particularly difficult.] A darling friend of mine is a regular performer at Bonfire so I mustered up a pinch of courage and cleared my calendar for the night.

This month’s Bonfire had fallen close enough to All Hallow’s Eve to warrant a call for costumes, so Tuesday evening I found myself desperately rifling through my wardrobe for something to wear. I’m not known for my casual stylings, but considering this would be my first time attending Bonfire, I decided to choose a somewhat-understated outfit. A subtle nod towards the macabre, if you will.

On top of a cascade of ivory polyester hair, I fixed a glittering life-sized skull, and, pressed for time, decided to skip foundation, instead favouring slashes of white paint across my face. Married with a floor-length black and white skirt and top, it would be sufficient to say the dress-code was met.

Unfortunately, my interpretation of ‘under-stated’ is generally an understatement, and walking towards the book shop, I could see a small crowd in the window dressed as, well, just normal people. But that, of course, is the delight of Bonfire at Desire; you can be the Voyeur or the Viewed.

The stage is set to serve creative ejaculations of all types. Perhaps you’ve been working on a Brechtian belly dance, or a splatter-punk sonnet inspired by Megan Fox? Bonfire is the equivalent of live Youtube, so anything goes!

The playing order is set using raffle-tickets. On arrival, you’ll be greeted by Katy, Desire’s owner, and if keen to sing, dance, rhyme, you’ll be given a ticket. Through the course of the night, numbers are drawn and if it’s yours, for five minutes, the stage is too.

After a face-melting performance by a man playing an alien-saucepan-instrument, my number, 7, was called.
Through crossed legs and bodiless coats, I tripped my way to the stage, nearly landing in somebody’s cup of goon and as I regained my balance, I felt a little sad I hadn’t fallen. It was now unavoidable that I would have to attempt to sing. On a stage. In front of people.

[Comparatively, death in a goon cup seemed like a perfectly acceptable way to have ended the night. My family could, at least, find comfort in blaming my untimely end on the poor sod, inside whose cup I had perished, and the whole situation would be passed off as an Unfortunate Event. Instead, they would now be cursed with disappointing memories of their late daughter who foolishly pretended to be a musician, choked onstage and died of humiliation.]

Escape plan thwarted, there was nothing to be done but to face the…music. Ha.

Stepping awkwardly onto the stage, I pushed away the microphone and sat down on an old green arm-chair in front of the crowd. As an aspiring actor, I’ve encountered a fair lump of expectant spectators. (Once, I was even sodomised by a lusty duke, in front of an audience that included my mother and grandmother.) Singing a simple country ditty for a salad of book-lovers should have been ‘no sweat.’ But sweat, I did and as I started to strum, my fingers rattled so hard they couldn’t form the first chord. Close to tears, eyes sticky with fear, all the lyrics vanished from my mind.

And I froze.

In that moment of silence, every mask I have ever worn fell away, and I was completely naked. For the first time in my life, I had nowhere to hide.

Then the audience, the loveliest most-encouraging bunch a musical neophyte could ask for, began to clap, and then the claps turned to cheers, and although the wet slicks of terror shone on my face, and a bowling ball I never swallowed stayed firmly in my throat, I sang that damn song, and I finished my first ever open-mic performance. I ain’t no Dixie Chick but, fuck, I felt proud, and though I sounded like a drowning duck, I am so happy to have popped my mic-night cherry with those super-talented, super-supportive human beans at Desire Books.

Located a safe distance from the stench of frying chips and tourists, you can find Desire opposite the Library Car Park on Whistler Street. Next time you’re wandering around Man-town, have a looky-loo, and if you’re interested, check their website for details on the next Bonfire and get your Kerouac/Gaga/Poe on. Go on, you know you want to. Hashtag YOLO.